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What If Apple Bought Tesla?

Rumors about Apple showing interest in buying Tesla have resurfaced after the SF Chronicle reported that Apple’s M&A chief met with Elon Musk last spring. Considering Tesla’s market capitalization of more than $24 billion, such a deal would be unprecedented for Apple, but the two companies do appear to have a lot of potential synergy.

As a thought experiment, let’s take a look at a few of the reasons Apple acquiring Tesla might make sense.

Apple has the cash for itApple still hasn’t found an ideal solution for its $160 billion cash hoard. Over the past year, the company has bought back $40 billion of its own shares, with plans to repurchase an additional $20 billion. That’s more than enough to have purchased Tesla outright. While there’s a certain sensible arrogance for a healthy company like Apple believing that repurchasing its own stock is the best investment of its cash, Tesla is poised for near-limitless growth if it can disrupt the automobile industry.

via The Next Web.

The Mac Turns 30!

Friday marks exactly three decades since Steve Jobs launched the Apple Macintosh, two days after the now-iconic 1984 commercial teased the computer to the world during Super Bowl XVIII.

Three decades and hundreds of Macs later, Apple is not only still cranking out innovative machines in personal computing, but has outlasted many of its original competitors.

“Every company that made computers when we started the Mac, they’re all gone,” Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing Philip Schiller told Macworld. “We’re the only one left. We’re still doing it, and growing faster than the rest of the PC industry because of that willingness to reinvent ourselves over and over.”

Although Apple is now better known for its mobile products, such as the iPhone and iPad, its most recent computers continue to garner positive reviews, including the MacBook Pro, MacBook Air and iMac. The company also recently launched an all-new Mac Pro, its top-of-the-line machine whose performance is meant for the high demands of professional video editors.

via Mashable.

Apple Turns On iBeacons!

iBeacon transmitters use Bluetooth 4.0 tech, and can be dialed in to a range of different distance sensitivities, which means that it can work on a hyper local basis, sending specific information only when you’re in the area for demos and workshops, for instance, or next to a particular product display. At the same time, it can provide general alerts to anyone who enters a store’s doors.

The upside for retailers using iBeacons is two-fold: First, they can offer more specific, targeted information to customers, which in theory helps with customer service (and could cut down on minor requests that would normally occupy staff). Second, iBeacons provides them with hyper-local data regarding customer movements within a store (apps could contain an opt-in for allowing use of that info). That kind of granular look at shopper behaviour could pay huge dividends in terms of helping formulate evolving retail strategy.

via TechCrunch.