Blog Archives

The future of web apps is — ready? — isomorphic JavaScript

Since the dawn of the Web, the browsing experience has worked like this: a web browser would request a particular page (say, “http://www.geocities.com/“), causing a server somewhere on the Internet to generate an HTML page and send it back over the wire. This has worked well because browsers weren’t very powerful and HTML pages represented documents that were mostly static and self-contained. JavaScript, created to allow web pages to be more dynamic, didn’t enable much more than image slideshows and date picker widgets.

After years of advances in personal computing, creative technologists have pushed the web to its limits, and web browsers have evolved to keep up. Now, the Web has matured into a fully-featured application platform, and fast JavaScript runtimes and HTML5 standards have enabled developers to create the rich apps that before were only possible on native platforms.

VentureBeat.

Advantages of Open Web Apps

Open Web Apps are essentially no different than standard websites or Web pages. They are built using standard open Web technologies — HTML, CSS, JavaScript, etc. — and can be accessed using a Web browser. The main differences lie in their ability to be installed on a device and work offline, and access to advanced APIs that allow interaction with device features such as the camera, address book, and other such things. In addition, they are built on open technologies as much as is possible. Where differences lie in technology implementation between platforms, efforts should be made to ensure that both are supported, through a combination of feature detection and appropriate code for different platforms, and graceful degradation.

Lets look at the advantages of Open Web Apps in a little more detail:

  • Local installation and offline storage: Open Web Apps can be installed on the device, and leverage APIs such as local storage and IndexedDB to provide local data storage capabilities. In addition, open Web technologies tend to have a much smaller footprint than native apps and can generally be updated atomically rather than having to install a complete new package each time theres an update. an exception to this is packages apps, which require a whole new package when updating. Apps are therefore less dependent on an always-on Web connection, and more useful when networks are patchy.
  • Hardware access: The metadata provided with Open Web Apps can be used to grant the application permission to privileged APIs that enable usage of device hardware features, something the Web platform has not traditionally enjoyed.
  • Breaking the walled gardens: The norm for mobile platforms tends to be be walled gardens written with proprietary technologies, so apps are locked inside their platforms. And smartphones tend to be expensive, and require credit cards for app purchases. Open Web Apps tend to be able to run on much cheaper hardware, especially in the case of Firefox OS devices where youve literally just got Firefox running on top of a lightweight Linux kernel. And they are written using open Web technologies, which is the most distributed platform around. In addition, Firefox OS devices feature payment systems where you can simply prepay for apps, or add the cost to your phone bill.
  • Open Web App stores: Following on from the previous point, you can choose to host your apps in an existing marketplace such as the Firefox Marketplace, or host them somewhere else entirely. Its up to you. Mozilla aims to put the developer back in control of every aspect of the app experience — from easy development to distribution to direct customer relationship management. And the apps can be searched for just like any other Web-based experience.

via MDN.

Bootstrap 3: Why all the hype?

Bootstrap is a front-end framework, which is basically just a few CSS and JavaScript files that help you build websites more quickly by purposely making some core decisions for you, and by including a lot of helpful, pre-made widgets and components. Since it’s all CSS and JavaScript, Bootstrap’s completely customizable, so there’s no harm in using it as a starting point.

I decided to use Bootstrap 3, which was released a few months ago, on some new personal projects and I’ve been very happy with the decision. There’s a lot packed into Bootstrap, but I’d like to highlight the things that have impressed me the most. If you’re still undecided or if you’re new to using front-end frameworks, hopefully this will help you understand what all the hype is about.

via Treehouse Blog.